Review of the Undead

Alright, as promised I’m doing my first “fiction Friday” book review.  Since we were talking about zombies on our camping trip, and that led to me deciding to do book reviews on my blog, I thought it would be fitting if I started with a zombie book.  So, in honor of this theme, I chose “The Forest of Hands and Teeth” by Carrie Ryan.

First off, this book has a great title.  Really, it’s the best zombie title I’ve seen, about a thousand times better than “Dawn of the Dead,” etc. (although Shaun of the Dead is a pretty good title, too, now that I think about it.  But since that’s a movie, it hardly counts).  But the question is, does it live up to its title? To be honest, when I first read this book a couple of months ago, I wasn’t so sure.  I definitely had mixed feelings about it, but since then I’ve found myself thinking about it at random times, and it stuck with me enough that I went out and bought the sequel, “The Dead-Tossed Waves,” even though it was still in hardback and I don’t actually like hardcovers on principle.

The basic plot is this (no spoilers–you could get most of this from the back of the book): Mary lives in a small village in the middle of the forest.  On all sides of their village is a fence, and on the other side of that fence is…you guessed it.  Zombies.  Hence the hands and teeth.  Her village is ruled by a Sisterhood of nuns, who teach them that they are the last people alive.  Shortly into the book, however, their fence is breached, and Mary and her friends have to venture out into the world, trying to find life in the midst of all that death.  Mary’s eventual goal is the ocean, but along the way she’ll have to decide between the two men who love her, subsequently destroying her friendship with her former best friend (actually, it was already pretty rocky by this point), and mending her relationship with her estranged brother.  She’ll discover truths about the forest, and the sisterhood, and the zombies on the other side of the fence, but most importantly, she’ll discover truths about herself.  And yeah, that sounds vague and lame, but I’m trying really hard not to give any spoilers here, so take it or leave it.

And now for the fun stuff.  First off, I love how they never refer to the undead in this book as “zombies.”  Instead, they call them “the Unconsecrated,” which sounds religious and creepy and really helps to make this book unique from all the other zombie books out there.  The Unconsecrated themselves are done really well; these are slow moving, relentless creatures who spend all their time hovering at the fence, moaning.  When they see people, they moan louder, and their fingers are all bloody and broken from trying to get in.  Later in the book, a new kind of Unconsecrated is introduced–a fast one, speeding back and forth and throwing itself at the fence with a ferocity that terrifies all the villagers.  And with good reason…

The characters in this book are well-done as well.  The main character, Mary, feels very real to me.  I like her because she’s not perfect, but she’s interesting and curious and strong.  A born survivor, she decides what she wants and she goes for it, which could be taken as selfishness, and really, it is that, but it also makes her a very intriguing character.  And it’s clear that she’s a good person, she just sees things from her own perspective.  I actually thought she was similar in many ways to Katniss from “Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins (great book–I’ll be reviewing it later)–both of them are strong female protagonists who look out for themselves first, although Katniss was a little more sympathetic to me because she loved her sister more than herself, whereas Mary comes first for Mary.

The other main characters are Harry, the boy Mary is supposed to marry, and his brother, Travis, the boy Mary actually loves.  What I liked best about them was that Harry wasn’t a total jerk.  Usually in those movies where the main female is with the guy she doesn’t love, he actually turns out to be a jerk, making it that much easier for the girl to move on to her actual love.  Real life isn’t like that.  People are all mixed bags of good and bad, and the characters in Carrie Ryan’s book are no exception to that.  In addition to Harry and Travis, there are Cass, Mary’s best friend, and Jed, Mary’s older brother.  Both of these characters are interesting because they start off as pillars of strength for Mary to lean on, and then they end up turning on her.  In fact, all the relationships in this book are handled very well.  I kept thinking certain characters would end up with other characters, and looking for the familiar patterns repeated over and over again in books and movies, and I kept being surprised by how things actually turned out.  That doesn’t happen too often, and it’s refreshing when it does.

Ultimately, there were three things I didn’t like about this book.  First of all, I felt like some parts were kind of glossed over.  Not to sound like a pervert or anything, but the author never actually mentions if Mary is sleeping with one or other of the boys in this book.  It’s inferred by the situation, but the fact that she doesn’t spell it out kind of bothered me, because it left me a little confused about their relationship.  Second, I wanted to know more information about the Sisterhood.  Mary starts to find out some disturbing facts, but then she’s forced to leave, and the book ends without that being resolved.  True, there’s the sequel, but I still felt like I needed just a little bit more closure.  On the other hand, this lack of closure is closer to real life, so maybe that’s not such a bad thing.  And third, I wasn’t sure how I felt about the ending, but then again, it’s a zombie book.  There’s no way a zombie book can end too happily.  Think about it–once there’s one zombie in the world, that’s the beginning of the end, really.  Unless they’re like the zombies in “28 Days Later,” which can actually starve to death.  Hint: the Unconsecrated are not that convenient. So really just the first thing bothered me, and just a little bit.

So, all in all I would say that on first read, I liked this book.  On a star scale, I would have given it a solid 3 of 5.  Then I sat on it for a while, and now, I’d actually give it at least 4 stars, probably 4.5.  And if you want to know the truth, the reason this book stuck with me is one line.  Just one line in the book that resounded with me so strongly I couldn’t get it out of my head.  Mary says, “He was everything.  Why couldn’t I see that he was everything?” And with this one bit of dialogue, I could feel all the regret and anguish that looking back always brings when you realize you’ve made the wrong choice and you can’t fix it.  Even now, my heart aches for her, and she’s just a bit of words on a page.  So that’s my conclusion–this book is a good idea with great details and characters that will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page.  Read it.

Writing versus Reading

I came across this post by agent Nathan Bransford asking whether people spend more time reading or writing, and since this is an issue I’ve struggled with personally, I thought it would make a good topic for my own post.  I’ve heard that you have to read in order to write–agent Janet Reid makes a comment about this on her post here where she says, “The idea you’ll write a novel without reading is like saying you’ll play pro basketball but not practice with your team. You’ll just show up and people will throw you the ball.”

However, I’ve also heard it said there are two kinds of people, those who read and those who write.  Personally, I’m more inclined to believe Janet Reid’s take on this, and not just because she’s the shark.  Most people I talk to who actually love to write, love to read as well.  If you don’t love to read, there doesn’t seem to be much point in creating yet more words.  That’s like people who hate to eat becoming chefs.  Does it happen? Maybe.  I don’t know.  But it certainly doesn’t make much sense.

Whenever I write and I get into the flow of my book, I feel like I’m reading.  In fact, when I’m really into it, there’s hardly any difference between reading and my writing except that my fingers are moving.  These are the parts of my manuscripts that are the best, versus the sections where I’ve had to painfully plot along, stringing a few words together, just trying to get through a scene.  So, since reading and writing are very similar if you’re in the flow in each, then it makes sense to me that the more you do of one, the better you’d be at the other.  The more books you read, the more stories you absorb, the better you’ll be at creating your own.  This is especially true if you read critically–analyzing bits of dialogue, character description, etc., while still enjoying the book.

However, on the flipside of this I’ve found that the more I read, the less I actually write.  I just have no self-control, and when I’m reading a good book, all I feel like doing is reading that book.  Writing, schoolwork, household chores, and all that important stuff just go right out the window.  Not only does this lead to some interesting fights with my husband, but it’s really not good for my attempts at a writing career if I’m not spending any time actually writing.  I try to pass it off as research, but I’m not really fooling anyone, least of all myself.  The worst part is when I’m in the middle of a series, because this can lead to days, weeks even of my doing nothing but reading.

So, how do you balance your reading and writing habits? I know someone who only reads on the lightrail to and from work, and when she’s home, she keeps the book closed.  Personally, I’ve found that I just need to have periods of time when I’m not reading a book.  Like right now, for instance.  Since I took that lovely hiatus the past couple of weeks, I’ve been staying away from books for a while, just so I can get my word counts back up again and get into my own writing.  I’d be interested in hearing any other suggestions people have for balancing these two.

Published in: on June 23, 2010 at 9:14 pm  Comments (2)  
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Harry Potter and the loss of my ambition

Sorry for the long delay in posts–I was spending some time hiking in Arizona, and then being lazy when I got back.

Hiking in Sedona

Anyways, today was my first official “writing as career” day, which was awesome! Too bad Harry Potter almost ruined everything.  How, you ask? Well, about a week ago I decided to re-read the first HP book, just to get in the flow, and wham! Suddenly I found myself reading all the time–I’m now halfway through the fifth book and my desire to do anything other than read Harry Potter has faded away.  My husband is especially annoyed by this.  Direct quote: “whenever you start reading Harry Potter everything else goes downhill; you stop writing, the house gets messy, you ignore your husband, etc., etc.”  I realized he was right, and last night I reluctantly put the book away.

This morning, I got up at 6:30 am, prepared to put in my first long day of writing in a long time, when I just happened to glance at my bedside table to see book five staring over at me.  I tried to ignore it as I packed up my computer.  Hem, hem, went the book.  I turned my back on it and started making my lunch.  Hem, hem.  Well, I decided, one little page won’t hurt.  Maybe I’ll read for five minutes and then go…and before I knew it, it was almost 8:00, and suddenly I was battling the parking lot that the highway is at that time to get to a coffee shop.  Why couldn’t I just work at home? Well, see above about the problem with reading Harry Potter, and imagine what your house would look like if you stopped putting away laundry, or doing dishes, or anything, for a week and a half.  It’s not a pretty picture, trust me.

Anyhow, that’s one of my big problems–when I get into a book or series, I get really into it, and I find it hard to do my own writing.  I know that reading is an important part of being writer, so I’ll just have to learn some self-control.  However, I did manage to put in three hours of work today on the sequel to my first book.  I now have the first chapter and a half done (3,267 words).  So, all in all, not a bad start.

Hem, hem

 

Published in: on April 19, 2010 at 7:24 pm  Comments (1)  
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